Returning to the Kamehameha line, we come next to Kinau, second daughter of the old sovereign by Kaheiheimalie, who became princess regent of the islands. She married first her cousin, Kahalaia, and had one son, but unfortunately both father and son died young. As it was important that in the position she held, that of an alii of highest rank, her line should be increased, she took unto herself an alii descended of an old line of noted warrior kings, Keawehanaui Kawalu, only son of Lonoikamakahiki Kapuokalani and Kaikilanialiiwahine o Puna, the ancestors of Kekuanaoa. Their firstborn was Moses Kekuaiwa, who died early, and their next son was Lot Kamehameha, who succeeded his younger brother, Alexander Liholiho {Kamehameha IV), as King Kamehameha V. Their only sister, Victoria Kamamalu, died during Kamehameha V’s reign.

Alexander Liholiho was adopted by his uncle, Kamehameha HI, so therefore took precedence on the throne, in the decree made by that king regarding the succession laws of the country. As Kamehameha V and his sister, Victoria Kamamalu, remained single and Kamehameha IV’s only child, the Prince of Hawaii (whose mother was Emma Kaleleonalani, the great-grand-daughter of Keealiimaikai, Kamehameha I’s brother), died very young, the throne was left void of heirs. Hence the hereditary sovereignty enjoyed by this illustrious royal family of the famous line of the Kamehamehas ceased with Kamehameha V’s death, and the country now was to pass on under the constitutional laws created and enacted by Kamehameha III, with the legislature of his time, whereby the sovereignty of the islands after the passing of the Kamehamehas should be an elected monarchy.


Kamehameha II